Dave Lovekin is the director of the Pembina Institute's work on renewables in remote communities. In his years with the Institute — Canada’s leading energy think tank — he has managed numerous corporate, community and government projects focusing on research and analysis to advance energy efficiency and renewable energy solutions in Canada.

Dave has worked with stakeholders in small businesses, industry, indigenous communities, government and non-governmental organizations on projects related to shifting focus from non-renewable to renewable energy technologies (including solar PV, wind, biomass, biogas and biofuel technologies, geothermal and overall energy efficiency solutions). He has conducted numerous life cycle assessments for various energy technologies and is certified to conduct greenhouse gas accounting through the Greenhouse Management Institute.

He holds a master's degree in systems design engineering from the University of Waterloo and is currently on the WWF Arctic renewable energy expert committee and the advisory committee for NRCan developing standards for biomass fuels and equipment in Canada.


Contact Dave Lovekin

cell: 250-634-0846

Send an email

Your Name
Your Email Address
Subject
Message
This is a media request or other urgent request
 
The Pembina Institute endeavors to maintain your privacy and protect the confidentiality of any personal information that you may give us. We do not sell, share, rent or otherwise disseminate personal information. Read our full privacy policy.
 

Dave Lovekin's Recent Publications

Recommendations on QEC CIPP policy application Joint briefing note to the Government of Nunavut

Publication
Sept. 15, 2020 - By Dave Lovekin, Marvin Quitoras, WWF-Canada, Nunavut Nukkiksautiit Corporation

This briefing note was submitted by WWF-Canada, Nunavut Nukkiksautiit Corporation and the Pembina Institute in response to QEC's Commercial Institutional Power Production policy proposal (May 2020). While we appreciate QEC’s effort to develop this CIPP policy, the policy as laid out will do little to encourage the adoption of renewable energy systems in Nunavut and therefore contribute little to put Nunavut on a path of transition away from diesel.

Cover of submission

Recommendations on QEC’s commercial institutional power production policy application Pembina Institute submission

Publication
July 27, 2020 - By Dave Lovekin, Marvin Quitoras

The Pembina Institute reviews the Qulliq Energy Corporation’s (QEC) commercial institutional power production (CIPP) application. Although it is encouraging to see this application, it is the Pembina Institute’s opinion that the proposed policy will do little to encourage renewable energy uptake for commercial and institutional customers in Nunavut. Several statements do not appear to meet the stated mandate of QEC to support renewable energy.

 

Tracking diesel reduction progress in remote communities Report shows current diesel use in remote communities, and outlines goals and future opportunities for diesel reduction

Blog
July 8, 2020 - By Dave Lovekin

In the past few years, important progress has been made toward reducing diesel dependency in remote communities. As a result of years of leadership and work within Indigenous communities to build capacity, impressively large renewable energy projects are coming on-line, and communities are leading their own energy transition. Increases in government funding programs that support diesel reduction projects have been important to recent progress.

Diesel Reduction Progress in Remote Communities Research Summary

Publication
July 6, 2020 - By Dave Lovekin, Jeremy Moorhouse, Vincent Morales, Ben Salek

This report collects and quantifies cumulative national diesel reduction progress from 2015-2020, outlining the progress made so far, and the opportunities to advance renewable energy and energy efficiency measures to reduce diesel use in Indigenous remote communities in Canada.

How B.C. can be a leader in economic reconciliation B.C.’s Indigenous utility regulatory inquiry – what does it all mean?

Blog
June 12, 2020 - By Dave Lovekin, Saeed Kaddoura

Of the 300-plus distinct First Nations reserves in British Columbia, 27 are remote communities, and most of these rely heavily on diesel generators as their primary energy source. But rather than depending on shipments of diesel into their hard-to-reach communities, they could harness abundant local renewable energy resources such as sun, wind, water and biomass to create local energy solutions that contribute to economic independence while creating local jobs.

Subscribe

Our perspectives to your inbox.

The Pembina Institute endeavors to maintain your privacy and protect the confidentiality of any personal information that you may give us. We do not sell, share, rent or otherwise disseminate personal information. Read our full privacy policy.