Nichole Dusyk is senior analyst working on federal environmental law reform. Her research with the Pembina Institute, Canada’s leading energy think tank, will create policy recommendations to ensure that federal energy decision-making is open, inclusive, and evidence-based. This includes investigating approaches to public engagement and models for the management and analysis of energy data.

Nichole’s previous research has examined how citizen engagement has influenced both the design of energy technologies and the formation of individual and collective identities. Focused primarily within British Columbia, this work has looked at municipal energy planning, large-scale hydroelectricity (Site C), wind energy, and bitumen pipelines. Nichole is passionate about ensuring that our discussion of energy systems includes the people and the places that are implicated in infrastructure development.

Nichole has a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from the University of Alberta, a master’s degree in science and technology studies from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and a doctoral degree in resource management and environmental studies from the University of British Columbia. 


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Nichole Dusyk's Recent Publications

cover for Does Canada's net-zero math add up?

Does Canada’s net-zero math add up? The emissions we count and where we count them matters in the Strategic Assessment of Climate Change

Publication
April 13, 2021 - By Nichole Dusyk

The math for calculating net-zero emissions seems simple. But it’s not, because the equation Canada is working with is flawed. Simply put, Canada’s definition of net-zero doesn’t add up. Because Canada’s definition of net-zero includes “avoided” emissions and does not require consideration of lifetime emissions when deciding whether a project is in the public interest, both sides of the ledger won’t necessarily be equal.

Cover of How to Get Net-Zero Right

How to Get Net-Zero Right Principles, tools and steps for safe, inclusive net-zero pathways

Publication
March 11, 2021 - By Isabelle Turcotte, Nichole Dusyk

Not all pathways to net-zero by 2050 are equal; more emissions now means more warming later. In How to Get Net-Zero Right, the Pembina Institute sets out guiding principles, steps, and tools for success for safe, inclusive pathways to net-zero by 2050. Core principles include putting people first with a greater focus on social justice and inclusion, carbon budgets, early and deep emissions cuts, and defined roles for carbon removal and offsets.

Drilling down on oil demand Canada needs a net-zero scenario to navigate the energy transition

Blog
Jan. 13, 2021 - By Nichole Dusyk

In order to successfully navigate the energy transition and avoid catastrophic climate change, Canada needs to chart a course toward its net-zero goal. A 1.5ºC  scenario will provide information vital to the journey.

Solar farm in southern Alberta

It’s time to bridge the gap between Canada’s energy future and climate targets To meet our climate commitments, Canada needs a net-zero energy outlook

Op-ed
Dec. 7, 2020 - By Nichole Dusyk

The most ambitious scenario in Canada’s Energy Future 2020, the Canadian Energy Regulator's annual energy supply and demand scenarios modelling the trajectory of Canada’s energy system to 2050, would not lead to the net-zero emissions in 2050 as enshrined in the Canadian Net-Zero Emissions Accountability Act. This is a stark reminder that here in Canada our energy policy and our climate policy are still on divergent paths.

Why Canada's Energy Future report leads us astray Examining assumptions and trends in Canada’s energy production

Blog
Jan. 9, 2020 - By Nichole Dusyk

The energy supply and demand implication of Canada’s Energy Future 2019 is that Canada will blow past our climate targets as our oil and gas sector effectively continues on a business-as-usual trajectory. But let us be clear — business-as-usual is not an option. It is counter to the government’s own targets and policy; it is counter to global energy trends; and it is counter to ensuring a liveable planet.

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The Pembina Institute endeavors to maintain your privacy and protect the confidentiality of any personal information that you may give us. We do not sell, share, rent or otherwise disseminate personal information. Read our full privacy policy.