Jan GorskiDirector, Oil and Gas

Jan is the director of the Pembina Institute's oil and gas program, based out of Calgary.  Prior to joining the Pembina Insitute, Jan worked in consulting on oil and gas emissions. Through this work he gained a thorough understanding of the technical challenges associated with quantifying emissions.
 
He holds a master's degree in mechanical engineering and a bachelor's degree in aerospace engineering, both from Carleton University. His graduate research was focused on alternative fuel combustion. He also completed an internship in Stuttgart, Germany, assisting with research at a carbon capture test facility.


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Jan Gorski's Recent Publications

Report cover with title and subtitle. Cover photo is wind turbines along the water with a lighthouse nearby.

Towards a Clean Atlantic Grid Clean energy technologies for reliable, affordable electricity generation in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia

Publication
Jan. 20, 2022 - By Jan Gorski, Binnu Jeyakumar

As Canada phases out coal power, other energy sources must replace it. This study shows that in New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, the clear winner is clean energy: a mix of resources (portfolios of renewables, battery storage, etc.) provide the same consistency of services as new gas or nuclear power plants, but at a lower cost. To provide reliable, affordable electricity and new jobs, both provinces should target clean energy portfolios for their next investments.

Transmission lines in front of a boreal forest backdrop. Photo by Stephen Hui.

No better time to invest in an electric future An interconnected net-zero grid optimizes Canada’s energy strengths beyond provincial borders

Op-ed
Nov. 9, 2021 - By Binnu Jeyakumar, Jan Gorski

At COP26, Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau joined the U.S. and U.K. in committing to a net-zero emissions electricity grid by 2035. It was a monumental step. A clean grid is so fundamental to reaching net-zero by 2050, the International Energy Agency set 2035 as the target date for developed countries in its landmark Net Zero by 2050 report. Key to delivering on this promise: more transmission lines to connect provincial grids and allow us, as a nation, to play to our strengths.

Cover of Connecting provinces for clean power grids

Connecting provinces for clean electricity grids Regional collaboration to unlock the power of hydro, wind and solar to decarbonize Canada’s economy

Publication
Sept. 17, 2021 - By Jan Gorski, Binnu Jeyakumar, Spencer Williams

Decarbonizing Canada's economy by 2050 requires governments to move quickly to reduce emissions from the electricity sector — starting with a commitment to achieve a net-zero grid by 2035. From coal phase-out to strong carbon pricing, broad policies and measures are key to accelerating supply of clean electricity to meet growing demand. Also key: interprovincial electricity grid connections to make the most of our renewable energy strengths.

cover of Carbon intensity of blue hydrogen

Carbon intensity of blue hydrogen production Accounting for technology and upstream emissions

Publication
Aug. 12, 2021 - By Jan Gorski, Karen Tam Wu, Tahra Jutt

As Canada moves ahead with national strategies to achieve net-zero by 2050, hydrogen is a key element in the plan. New research shows that the climate benefits of blue hydrogen vary widely. Made with natural gas using carbon capture and storage to reduce emissions, the carbon footprint of blue hydrogen depends on the extraction and transportation method of the natural gas, and the production methods used to separate hydrogen from methane.

cover for raising ambition

The case for raising ambition in curbing methane pollution Higher federal and provincial targets on methane are within reach

Publication
Aug. 4, 2021 - By Jan Gorski

Canada needs to get as close as possible to eliminating methane emissions by the end of this decade to help reach its net-zero goal, and should set a 2030 target of at least 75% below 2012 emission levels. Federal and provincial governments should set more ambitious targets to reduce methane emissions and implement the policies to achieve them. The technologies to drastically cut emissions of this harmful pollutant are commercially available and economic.

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The Pembina Institute endeavors to maintain your privacy and protect the confidentiality of any personal information that you may give us. We do not sell, share, rent or otherwise disseminate personal information. Read our full privacy policy.