Pembina Institute

Pembina reacts to Environment Canada’s projections for national greenhouse gas emissions

Published Oct. 24, 2013.

P.J. Partington, climate policy analyst at the Pembina Institute, made the following comments today in response to Environment Canada’s publication of Canada’s Emissions Trends 2013:

“Canada is moving in the wrong direction on addressing greenhouse gas pollution. The government has promised Canadians that pollution levels will drop, but Environment Canada is forecasting that they will increase.

“Another year of delay and inaction from the federal government means we’re even farther from our national goal than we were in last year’s edition. In contrast, U.S. government projections show that the United States can achieve its identical 2020 national commitment if it implements the actions outlined in the President’s Climate Action Plan.  

“It’s time for the Harper Government to change this picture before it’s too late.  The most crucial component of a credible plan to get Canada back on track is strong regulations for the oil and gas sector.”

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Contact:

P.J. Partington
Policy Analyst, Climate Change

Cell: 647-706-6648

Desk: 647-478-9563 x212

Kevin Sauvé
Communications Lead
Cell: 604-354-2628
Desk: 604-874-8558 x231

Background:

Canada’s Emissions Trends is a crucial assessment for understanding greenhouse gas trajectories in Canada. Here are some key points from the report:

  • Canada’s greenhouse gas emissions are projected to be 734 Mt in 2020, after accounting for all federal and provincial policies currently in place. This is 122 Mt above Canada’s target level of 612 Mt.
  • Under the Copenhagen Accord, Canada and the US committed to the same emissions reduction goal of 17% below the 2005 level by 2020.
  • Greenhouse gas pollution from the oilsands is projected to triple between 2005 and 2020 and poses a major challenge to achieving Canada’s commitments.
  • This backgrounder explores Canada’s climate action in a U.S. context.
  • We wrote about last year’s edition of Canada’s Emissions Trends here.
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