Pembina Institute

Op-Eds

Filtered by: British Columbia
previous • top • next
sort by date • sort by title
Matt Horne

Published in The Tyee (Dec. 17, 2012)

By Matt Horne

The greenhouse gas pollution produced by the wells, pipelines, processing plants and liquefaction facilities needed to fulfill British Columbia’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) aspirations will make it impossible for the province to meet its climate change commitments. Yet, the province says it still intends to “maintain leadership on climate change and clean energy.”

Having trouble squaring that circle? You wouldn’t be alone.

Karen Campbell

Published in The Vancouver Sun (March 12, 2007)

By Karen Campbell

In the weeks following the throne speech, both the B.C. budget and the new B.C. Energy Plan showed little of the forward-thinking and innovative approaches that characterized the speech.

Matt Horne

Published Nov. 26, 2007

By Matt Horne

The government has announced a number of first steps towards its target for 2020 - to cut BC's emissions by 33 per cent below current levels. But are they enough?

Beyond Carbon Tax

Creating a Sustainable Vision for a Greener World

Josha MacNab

Published in The Tyee (July 23, 2008), Caribou Press (July 30, 2008)

By Josha MacNab

British Columbia's carbon tax holds the potential to inspire a new vision: to transform the economy from the brown, carbon-based solutions of the past to the clean, green sustainable solutions of the future.

Matt Horne

Published in The Vancouver Sun (June 3, 2008)

By Matt Horne

Just as British Columbia passes the first carbon tax in Canada into law, a new poll by McAllister Opinion Research has revealed that more than 70 per cent of Canadians support British Columbia's carbon tax as a "positive step" towards reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Dan Woynillowicz

Published in iPolitics (July 4, 2012)

By Dan Woynillowicz

With the passage of the omnibus budget bill, the Harper government has begun downloading oversight and dismantling environmental protection in order to expedite oilsands development and pipelines to new markets. Harper’s cabinet ministers frequently remind Canadians that increased oilsands development is needed to generate the tax revenue needed to support delivery of the services and programs we all hold dear, like education and healthcare.

But over the past several months that mantra has been challenged, with various think-tanks, analysts and pundits fuelling an important discussion about the economic impacts — both positive and negative — of booming oilsands development.

Karen Campbell

Published in Georgia Straight (Feb. 27, 2009)

By Karen Campbell

As British Columbia and the rest of the world grapple with increasing evidence of dangerous climate change, there is a new urgency to find solutions. From carbon taxes to home energy retrofits, there is no shortage of proposals — but is there a quick fix? Enter carbon capture and storage, or CCS as it is known by industry...

Alison Bailie

Published in The Tyee (Jan. 13, 2014)

By Alison Bailie

The connection between LNG development and carbon pollution is significant. And just how the government chooses to manage both issues will have serious long-term implications for the province, and the country.

Matt Horne

Published in The Vancouver Sun ()

By Matt Horne, Ian Bruce, Merran Smith

The announcement of a pending review of the carbon tax provides an opportunity to build a better B.C.

Matt Horne

Published in The Vancouver Sun (May 5, 2010)

By Matt Horne

If carbon taxes really did kill private sector jobs, you wouldn't expect to find this statement on the website of B.C.'s largest emitter, Spectra Energy: "We believe that a workable federal climate change program should . . . provide certainty about costs of compliance, preferably through a simple, efficient, revenue-neutral carbon tax."

Karen Campbell

Published in The Vancouver Sun (April 15, 2009)

By Karen Campbell

British Columbians have made it clear that they are committed to taking action on global warming. Emboldened by this support, the B.C. government has demonstrated continental leadership by legislating reductions in carbon pollution, shifting taxes away from British Columbians' income and onto pollution (reducing taxes on a good thing and increasing them on a bad one)...

Marlo Raynolds

Published in Edmonton Journal (Feb. 6, 2010), Guelph Mercury (Feb. 9, 2010), Waterloo Region Record (Feb. 9, 2010)

By Marlo Raynolds

Marlo Raynolds argues that the real challenge for Canada's Prime Minister is whether he is able to create a made-in-Canada climate plan — or leave it to American lawmakers to decide our climate and, therefore, economic policy.

Nathan Lemphers

Published in The Vancouver Sun (Dec. 18, 2010)

By Nathan Lemphers

Imagine going into a bank to apply for pre-approval for a mortgage. You don't have a steady income, so instead you present 10 cheques. They're one-time-only payments from anonymous sources and they don't amount to much of a down payment.

The bank would tell you to go home, get a steady job and come back when you've got long-term employment. Until then, you're wasting their time.

Karen Campbell

Published in The Vancouver Sun (May 7, 2010), Troy Media (May 2, 2010), Victoria Times-Colonist (May 5, 2010), Winnipeg Free Press (May 6, 2010), Trail Daily Times (May 6, 2010)

By Karen Campbell

As oil gushes into the Gulf of Mexico, the consequences of a spill from the proposed Enbridge oilsands pipeline and related tanker traffic are all the more real.

Matt Horne

Published in The Vancouver Sun (July 4, 2012), Point Carbon (July 20, 2012)

By Matt Horne

Last week, energy consultant Aldyen Donnelly presented a dizzying array of numbers and claims to criticize a recent study on British Columbia’s carbon tax that was co-authored by the Pembina Institute and the Energy and Materials Research Group at Simon Fraser University.

The problem is, Donnelly’s numbers ignored much of the important evidence on B.C.’s carbon tax and similar policies around the world.

Matt Horne

Published in Globe and Mail (Dec. 7, 2012)

By Matt Horne

Whether it is the federal government’s ongoing campaign against carbon taxes or the lack of discussion in other parts of the country, most Canadians hear very little about the fact that the country’s west coast is home to one of the world’s best climate policies.

Greg Brown

Published in The Terrace Standard, British Columbia (June 27, 2007)

By Greg Brown

The BC Transmission Corporation (BCTC) ran open houses last month regarding a proposed 287 kV power line. Is the BCTC truly considering the needs of northern B.C. communities?

Greg Brown

Published in Prince Rupert Daily News (Dec. 1, 2009)

By Greg Brown

Wild salmon are in trouble in British Columbia, and they face yet another threat in the form of a pipeline proposed by Enbridge to bring oilsands products through their habitat to the coast.

Matt Horne

Published in BCBusiness magazine (March 3, 2010)

By Matt Horne

If you show up at the landfill with a truck full of garbage, you have to pay to dump it. But if you pump pollution into the atmosphere, most Canadian jurisdictions provide a free dumping ground.

Dan Woynillowicz

Published in Globe and Mail (June 1, 2012)

By Dan Woynillowicz

Canada needs more light and less heat on the economic impacts of oilsands expansion.

When it comes to energy issues, the list of things that are apparently too “divisive” to discuss seems to grow by the day — from climate change and pollution reduction, to a national energy strategy, and most recently the impacts of booming oilsands development across the Canadian economy.

Filtered by: British Columbia
previous • top • next
sort by date • sort by title

Copyright © The Pembina Institute. All rights reserved.